Friday, February 12, 2010

networking, not working

WIth all the promotion around The Spark Singer and Backstage and various shows and trips, I feel increasingly that I don't have time to just sit down and WRITE.

It's a common problem, I think. But it seems like that time that used to go to holing myself up and losing myself in that creative space so often now goes to emails, phone calls, photos, website updates, event planning, and endless, endless, "networking."

I feel like to write you have to keep a little part of yourself secret. It's a hard balancing act when you're also trying to put your work (and yourself) out there. I feel like you have to develop a persona that's separate from the inner creator that sort of acts as the external face of that private part, but whose real job is to throw people off.

If any artists are reading this, do you experience this? With a modicum of success comes a titanic time-suck. Do you find it frustrating to carve out time to work on NEW work?

3 comments:

Jess said...

YES. When I graduated college and was trying to shop around manuscripts and get into the slam scene in a new city while also trying to find a job and get used to living with a significant other...not good for my writing. I spent way too much time at the front of my mind

And maybe that's why I'm studying to be a nutritionist now. Keeping the creative side of myself satisfied has become quite a balancing act, but I make an attempt because you can't hang up the urge to communicate through art. Sometimes, though, I'm so worn out from a day dealing with really sick patients that I'm too tired to write anything of much substance.

My classmates and co-workers think it's cool that I have this double-life as a writer, but I wouldn't want my patients to find out about how vulnerable and human I am, you know? I also don't feel like it's fair to write about them, so sometimes that gets in the way too.

Jade Sylvan said...

I feel like to write you have to keep a little part of yourself secret. It's a hard balancing act when you're also trying to put your work (and yourself) out there. I feel like you have to develop a persona that's separate from the inner creator that sort of acts as the external face of that private part, but whose real job is to throw people off.

I actually might paste this response to your response into my post.

Jess said...

You should—I think that makes a lot of sense. That's a big part of why I'm changing my name. I find that I really need the separation.